Round Table on Information Access for People with Print Disabilities facilitates and influences the production and use of quality alternative formats for people with print disabilities by optimising the evolving Round Table body of knowledge.

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2017 Round Table Conference

Conference Theme

“Information Access – new modes, technologies and opportunities”

Information access is important to all persons with print disabilities, and has many dimensions including format (braille, large print, E-text, etc.), facilities (libraries, agencies, educational institutions, government bodies) and modes of access (tablet, laptop, refreshable braille). The 2017 Conference will explore the ever-expanding opportunities presented to people with print disabilities for communication, learning and information access and creation.

This conference provides three full days of technical, research and panel sessions, presentations and practical workshops on issues related to accessibility. There are also many opportunities for networking and socialising with key speakers, panel members and attendees.

Dates and Venue

Saturday, 6 May 2017 – Tuesday, 9 May 2017

Mercure Perth, 10 Irwin Street, Perth WA 6000

Call for Papers Are Now Open

Closing date for submission of Abstracts: Wednesday, 30 November 2016.

Call for Abstracts Paper (48 KB)

Abstract Submission Form (36 KB)


The noticeboard contains:

  • Round Table newsletters
  • ICEVI publications
  • information and news, often supplied from other organisations.

While Round Table strives to make the information on the noticeboard as relevant, timely and accurate as possible the inclusion of information on this page does not constitute endorsement by Round Table.

 New links from the Resources Page

  • Accessible coding training is now child’s playWith coding ability rapidly becoming as fundamental a skill as literacy and numeracy, young people with a visual impairment have been facing hurdles that a new solution from Apple aims to fix.
    This upcoming iPad release is called Swift Playgrounds (link is external) and teaches basic coding, with built-in accessibility in mind. Free from the iTunes Store, Swift Playgrounds will use game-like experiences to teach children, and people new to coding of all ages, how to carry out basic programming in the language that underpins all iOS apps.
    The task-based, interactive app introduces users to coding by getting them to create the instructions that move a character through a variety of fun, puzzle-like challenges. Users with a visual impairment can use ‘VoiceOver’ to play the game and learn to code, as this functionality is included within Swift Playgrounds, meaning that users can start playing with it straight after download.
    The app will be released in spring and comes after Apple was honoured by the American Council of the Blind for its advances in accessibility and opened a dedicated accessibility section in the online Apple store.
  • New free technology resource for teachers of the deaf – Australian not-for-profit, Conexu Foundation, has developed a free resource guide for teachers aimed at students who are Deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired, entitled ‘11 easy to use technologies to enhance learning in your classroom’.As there are so many different options now available, technology can sometimes feel overwhelming, particularly for teachers of large class sizes. This is why this new resource for teachers was created, in order to offer them a practical guide for how technology can be used to help improve learning outcomes and accessibility for Deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired students in primary and secondary schools.
  • Me Myself Eye is an important new educational resource, designed by VisAbility to give people an insight into what life is like for children living with vision impairment and blindness.
    This is an interactive website that puts empathy at its heart. It encourages us to step into the shoes of these children and their families. It allows us start to understand on a deeper, more emotional level, what it actually means to live with childhood vision impairment.
    It involves a wide range of games, books, videos and activities for students, teachers and parents. It uses storytelling to connect people with the experiences of these children, and it does so to promote their inclusion, independence and participation in everyday life.
  • Tom’s Top Ten Tips for Accessible DocumentsA tip sheet produced for the very popular session “Word and PDF accessible documents: What you need to know”  held at the 2014 Round Table Conference, presented by Tom Smith, Accessible Information Consultant, Blind Foundation New Zealand.

Refer to our Resources page and Useful Links for more references relevant to print disability.

Free guidelines

Round Table Guidelines on alternative format standards can be downloaded free of charge. The most recent publications are:

What is a print disability?

People with a print disability are those who cannot obtain access to information in a print format because they:

  1. are blind or vision impaired
  2. have physical disabilities which limit their ability to hold or manipulate information in a printed form
  3. have perceptual or other disabilities which limit their ability to follow a line of print or which affect their concentration

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Contact details

Postal address: 13 Myee Crescent, Baulkham Hills. NSW 2153 Email: admin@printdisability.org

Last updated: September 30, 2016 at 15:08 pm